Archive | Editorials

Here We Go Again–Andris Nelsons Will Record (Gasp!) Beethoven and Bruckner

There was a time when recording a Beethoven cycle was an enterprise undertaken with the benefit of a lifetime’s familiarity with the music, redolent with the (theoretical) wisdom of—if not old—at least a very mature age. Many of the greatest 20th-century conductors never completed their recorded traversals of all nine symphonies, at least not in […]

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ClassicsToday.com’s Top Ten CDs of 2015

I have to confess that we weren’t planning on doing a “best of the year” feature. Let’s face it: there are many superb recordings issued every year and no one can listen to enough of them to claim that their sample is truly “the best”; but then again, there’s no harm in picking a “Top […]

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Six Christmas CDs That Always Make The List, Pt. 1

Over the past 20-plus years I have accumulated hundreds of Christmas CDs–featuring choirs, orchestras, brass ensembles, guitar, harp, string quartet, piano, organ, etc., etc.–and I appreciate most of them for various reasons; but no matter how many newcomers join the collection, there are a few “oldies” that have more than stood the test of time. […]

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Six Christmas CDs That Always Make The List, Pt. 2

Since publishing last year’s “Six Christmas CDs That Always Make the List”, a few more titles either newly released or left out of the original group made their case for inclusion so strongly that I had to add a “Part 2”. So, here are another six Christmas CDs that together with the first set add […]

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The Minnesota Orchestra: Is “Class” A Quantifiable Commodity?

For months now I have been reading stories of the impasse between management and musicians in Minnesota. The lock-out of the Minnesota Orchestra has many complicating factors: the lavish expenditure to renovate the orchestra’s hall, the departure of Music Director Osmo Vänskä, the bad blood between the parties, and the attempts at settlement both public […]

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The Truth About Composers Who Died of Syphilis

You read about it regularly in composers’ biographies. Schubert, Donizetti, Schumann, Smetana, Wolf, Joplin, Delius—all were likely victims of syphilis. Other STDs were just as common in ages past. Rossini, for example, suffered from gonorrhea throughout his later life, and was so full of enthusiasm for his urinary catheters that he kept them on display […]

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Kathleen Ferrier: England’s Greatest Contralto, or Fruit Basket?

Editor’s Note: As 2012 marks the centenary of Ferrier’s birth, a reposting of this article seems warranted. 2003 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Kathleen Ferrier, an English icon whose continued popularity among a fanatical legion of admirers based in the United Kingdom continues to puzzle and amuse many music and voice (the […]

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5 Quick Tips on How to Search & Navigate the New ClassicsToday.com

The new ClassicsToday.com has undergone some major upgrades and enhancements over the past few weeks (and a few more to come as well). We thought it would be helpful to share some tips about how and where to find your favorite classical music reviews and editorial information within our new system. 5 Quick Search Form […]

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EDITORIAL: TO HELL WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

Reality Check: The Future of Classical Music Lies With Seniors Maybe it’s because I’ve just turned 40, but it seems that everywhere I turn I’m confronted with the “crisis” of classical music and today’s youth. Gramophone magazine is retooling itself to reach a younger audience. Policy makers and supporters of the arts attend lectures on […]

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EDITORIAL: LINES AND CHORDS AND THE MUSICIANS WHO LOVE THEM

Are your favorite artists Line Guys or Chord Guys? For some time now Classicstoday.com editor David Hurwitz and I have enjoyed a running dialogue on the endlessly fascinating topic that we have come to call “line guys” and “chord guys.” What this means is simple: Conductors and pianists generally fall into one of these two […]

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