Archive | Editorials

THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

Here’s a news item I’d love to see: WARNER APOLOGIZES FOR BARENBOIM SCHUMANN CYCLE New York, February 4, 2004. The president of the AOL/Time Warner entertainment group has offered an official apology for the release of Daniel Barenboim’s superb new recording of Schumann’s complete symphonies. The written statement reads: “We never actually planned to issue […]

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THE CLASSICS ARE DEAD, LONG LIVE THE CLASSICS!

A few months ago I took Norman Lebrecht to task for his editorial announcing the death of the classical record industry. So far the industry seems to be humming along just fine, thank you, but it occurred to me that on a deeper level perhaps there is a death worth discussing, although the tragedy (if […]

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Let’s Just Say Bach Wrote It

Cleaning Up the Universe of Classical Music Organists aside, does anyone really care about Baroque organ music? I say this not to denigrate the period or the medium, but rather to lament that fact that so much magnificent stuff goes unnoticed by the public at large, while the same few famous works of Bach get […]

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Carlos Kleiber Is Dead, But For How Long?

The death of Carlos Kleiber on July 13 at the age of 74 brings to a sudden end the sporadically active career of one of the most enigmatic yet respected conductors of this century. Of course, the respect to some extent stemmed from the enigma, but far be it from me to deny any artist […]

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The Classical Olympics: An Idea Whose Time Has Come

Another four years and another summer Olympics, not entirely without controversy, have come and gone. Amidst the hoopla and hysteria, this seems an appropriate time to take stock and once again decry the dearth of classical music events at the summer games. With the ongoing talk of eliminating Women’s Softball in 2012 as a result […]

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Stop the Madness: Orchestras, Stay Home

The new concert season is now upon us, and with it will come one of the most peculiar spectacles in the arts: the annual round of international tours by orchestras the world over. Once a laudable effort to introduce classical music to those who might otherwise never have had the opportunity to see a great […]

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BACH AND HAYDN SPEAK OUT ON TERRI SCHIAVO

The ongoing, tragic saga of Terri Schiavo, the severely brain-damaged Florida woman struck down by catastrophic illness in 1990 and subsequently determined to be “in a persistent vegetative state,” has put the whole country in an uproar–understandably so. This is an agonizing situation with genuine public policy implications. Michael Schiavo, the husband who has been […]

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TIMES HAVE CHANGED, SO HAVE WE

Every so often I see a comment to the effect that, believe it or not, we are too nice, and give too many recordings high ratings. It doesn’t happen often: at least not as often as we receive hate mail from fans of artists that we have panned. Nevertheless I was speaking to my colleagues […]

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THE EU CONSTITUTION AND THE ARTS

Thank God it’s dead! Granted, the French and the Dutch voted “no” to the proposed EU constitution for the wrong reasons, but then who had the time or energy to actually read that bloody 400+ page behemoth, produced by an unaccountable collection of bureaucrats to better entrench themselves at the center of European political life? […]

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THE DEATH OF THE HORENSTEIN CULT?

It’s well known that performers of all stripes, and not just in classical music, sometimes amass a cult following, particularly if the artists in question have the good fortune to be dead. If they died tragically, even better. If they died tragically and made very few recordings, and those of dubious quality, better still. The […]

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