Author Archive | David Hurwitz

Editorial: Sexual Shenanigans, Classical Musicians, and Recordings

The first thing that came to mind as the story of James Levine’s, and then Charles Dutoit’s, sexual peccadillos came to light over the past few weeks was, “We’re only hearing about this now?” The former, at least, was hardly news. Levine’s alleged behavior with young boys has been one of classical music’s biggest open […]

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ARTISTS YOU CAN TRUST: 2017

TEN “ARTISTS YOU CAN TRUST” 2017 EDITION It’s common for review publications, newspapers, and radio stations to come out with “best of” year-end selections, but the big problem with these is that there are always too many recordings to even begin to do justice to the range of options available. Also, we don’t want to […]

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The Orchestra Now and JoAnn Falletta: Youth and Agility

Thursday, December 14, 2017: Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, New York The Orchestra Now is another initiative of the indefatigable Leon Botstein, and part of the graduate program in performance at Bard College. Members of the group introduce the music being played, and appear in the lobby at intermission to mingle with concert attendees. It’s […]

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Philly, Hahn and Nézet-Séguin Rock Adès, Bernstein and Sibelius

December 8, 2017: Carnegie Hall, New York Hot off of a successful international tour with his Montreal Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin cruised into Carnegie Hall last night with (one of) his other principal orchestras, and demonstrated why he’s currently such a choice commodity in today’s world of classical music. It would be hard […]

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Fine Whine From Stormin’ Norman Redux

Originally posted at the beginning of 2004, this seems like a good time, nearly fourteen years later, to revisit Norman Lebrecht’s “rock solid” prediction that the year 2004 would be “the last for the classical record industry.” I provide my entire original article below. In his latest effort to sound the death knell for the […]

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Conference Report: Music Criticism 1950-2000 (Day 3)

Barcelona: October 11, 2017 Conference Organized By:  Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca and the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Barcelona Sitting with friends in a tapas bar in the center of Barcelona Tuesday night, we saw Catalonian President Carles Puigdemont (pr. Poojdemon) make an endless speech in which he declared independence, then suspended the declaration indefinitely, […]

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Music Criticism: 1950-2000 (Day 2)

Barcelona: October 10, 2017 Conference Organized By:  Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca and the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Barcelona Day Two of the conference on Music Criticism: 1950-2000 opened with a morning-long session devoted to Music Criticism and Italian Film Music. Now, I love film music, and the Italian variety is a particularly rewarding field […]

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CONFERENCE REPORT: MUSIC CRITICISM 1950-2000

Barcelona: October 9, 2017 Conference Organized By:  Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca,  and the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Barcelona This is the final conference is a series that encompasses studies on music criticism from the nineteenth century to the present day. It has brought together an impressive range of scholars from around the world, presenting […]

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A Remarkable New Toscanini Biography

Harvey Sachs: Toscanini, Musician of Conscience (Liveright Publishing Corporation [W.W. Norton], 2017). Arturo Toscanini was a simple man at heart. He had three great passions: conducting, screwing, and complaining. Some readers will be most interested in the first of these, some, I suppose, the second, and none the third. Harvey Sachs, in this wholesale rewrite […]

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Salonen Conducts the MET Orchestra in Mahler, Off and On

Wednesday, May 31, 2017: Carnegie Hall The MET Orchestra Esa-Pekka Salonen, Conductor; Susan Graham, Mezzo-Soprano; Matthew Polenzani, Tenor All-Mahler Program: Songs from Des Knaben Wunderhorn; Symphony No. 1 Esa-Pekka Salonen hasn’t got a shred of authentic Mahlerian schmaltz in him. The results, in the opening selection of ten songs from the folk poetry anthology Des Knaben Wunderhorn, were just strange. […]

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