Author Archive | David Hurwitz

Editorial: Classical Music’s Ten Dirtiest Secrets

Classical Music’s Ten Dirtiest Secrets Considering how culturally valuable and self-evidently important classical music is supposed to be, its proponents are a surprisingly defensive group. At performing arts organizations, press departments fret that the slightest negative comment about an artist might attract public notice. What little marketing that takes place with respect to recordings always […]

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Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal’s Sensitive, Detailed Mozart and Bruckner

Friday, November 22, 2019: Carnegie Hall, New York The Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal presented a program of Mozart and Bruckner on its first U.S. tour, featuring the overture and stellar mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato in the two big arias for high voice from the former’s La Clemenza di Tito, and the latter’s “Romantic” Symphony (No. 4). […]

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Orchestra of St. Luke’s Plays Bach and Mendelssohn

Thursday, October 17, 2009 8pm. Carnegie Hall, NY Bach and Mendelssohn always go well together, the one having been a major influence on the other, and so it proved Thursday evening at Carnegie Hall, when the Orchestra of St. Luke’s presented two Bach keyboard concertos framed by two of Mendelssohn’s most popular orchestral works, The […]

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Cult Conductors: A New Review Series

We live in an era when more recordings of more music by more artists are available than at any time before. In particular, the release of Big Boxes of live performances, radio broadcasts, and even commercial recordings now in the public domain, have given collectors the opportunity to sample extensively the output of conductors whose […]

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Crumb at 90 Part II: Ghosts, Angels, and Music for a Summer Evening

Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center: April 16, 2019, Alice Tully Hall (New York City) All Crumb Program: The Ghosts of Alhambra (Spanish Songbook I) for Voice, Guitar, and Percussion; Black Angels (Thirteen Images from the Dark Land) for Electric String Quartet; Music for a Summer Evening (Makrokosmos III) for Two Amplified Pianos and Percussion […]

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Simone Young Shines in Mahler’s Sixth at the NY Phil

Friday, April 12, 11am, David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center, NY It’s no small task to step in at the last minute and take over a symphonic megalith like Mahler’s Sixth, but conductor Simone Young did just that when New York Philharmonic Music Director Jaap van Zweden bowed out due to injury (I’ll bet you didn’t […]

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The Juilliard Quartet Shines at Alice Tully Hall

New York. Alice Tully Hall: November 19, 2018. 7:30pm Program: Beethoven: String Quartet in D major, Op. 18 No. 3; Beecher: One Hundred Years Grows Shorter Over Time;  Dvorák: “American” String Quartet This evening’s program featured the Juilliard Quartet in its latest incarnation, with new first violinist Areta Zhulla. Certainly the ensemble’s famed rhythmic precision […]

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Have Some Honey With Your Haydn

Did you know that there are more than 300 types of honey produced in the United States alone? Amazing, I know. Honeybees are fascinating creatures, and while working my way through the wonderful world of varietal (a.k.a. monofloral) honeys that they produce, it occurred to me that there are some striking similarities between the sweet […]

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Putting Conductors In Their Place: Sexual Harassment and the Death of the “Maestro Myth”

In the wake of an excellent article by Anne Midgette and Peggy McGlone in The Washington Post on sexual harassment in the classical music business, Holland’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra announced that it had terminated the ensemble’s relationship with chief conductor Daniele Gatti. To its credit, the orchestra did not rely solely on allegations detailed in […]

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Book Review: Furtwängler’s Writings–The Intellectual Biography of a Second-Rater

Roger Allen. Wilhelm Furtwängler: Art and the Politics of the Unpolitical. The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2018 (286pp). Just how smart was Wilhelm Furtwängler? That he was musically gifted there can be no question, but there is a significant difference between being talented and being intelligent. Similarly, one can be very highly educated—as a function of […]

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