New Saint-Saëns Edition From Bärenreiter

Bärenreiter begins an edition of the works of Camille Saint-Saëns–Bärenreiter is embarking on a major new project, the publication of a historical-critical edition of the complete instrumental works of the French composer Camille Saint-Saëns (1835–1921). The 36 volumes will include all the symphonic and concert works, chamber music, and pieces for keyboard instruments. Editorial director […]

Continue Reading

Royal Concertgebouw Leads Bychkov In Mahler 5th

Carnegie Hall, New York: November 30, 2016, 8pm Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Semyon Bychkov (cond.) Detlev Glanert is a contemporary composer who takes himself very seriously. His Theatrum bestiarum, subtitled “Songs and Dances for Large Orchestra” supposedly explores the juxtaposition of man and beast, expresses primal terror, and has something to do with Caligula. The piece […]

Continue Reading

Rossini’s Operatic Swan Song, Guillaume Tell, At The Met

Metropolitan Opera, Lincoln Center, N.Y. October 25, 2016—It has been 80 years since the Metropolitan Opera staged Rossini’s final opera, Guillaume Tell. A gigantic work lasting four-plus hours, here it is presented almost complete, with only a piece of ballet and a few recitatives omitted—about 15 minutes’ worth. The issue with it is not its […]

Continue Reading

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE REPORT: MUSIC CRITICISM 1900-1950 (II)

Music Criticism 1900-1950 Organized by: Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca and the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Barcelona The second day of discussions concerning Music Criticism from 1900 to 1950 featured still more stimulating papers on a wide range of topics. These included Music Criticism under Italian Fascism, and a particularly intriguing trio of presentations on […]

Continue Reading

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE REPORT: MUSIC CRITICISM 1900-1950

Barcelona: October 18, 2016 Conference Organized By: Centro Studi Opera Omnia Luigi Boccherini, Lucca and the Societat Catalana de Musicologia, Barcelona Greetings from Barcelona! This is CT.com Executive Editor David Hurwitz reporting as a participant in the above conference, part of a series devoted to the history of music criticism in the 19th and 20th centuries. This is, […]

Continue Reading

Ailyn Perez Sings Glorious Mimi At The Met

Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, NY, September 28, 2016—It’s always good to re-visit the Met’s production of La bohème, particularly when new singers have been called in to navigate the vast stage with Franco Zeffirelli’s stunning and gargantuan sets. Critics balk at the scale of the production, some claiming that the singers get lost in […]

Continue Reading

Mascagni’s Overwrought Iris Shines At Bard

The Fisher Center, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, N.Y; July 31, 2016—Although Mascagni’s Iris never achieved the popularity of the composer’s Cavalleria rusticana, within four years of its Rome premiere it had been heard in Milan, all over Europe, in South America, and in New York. To my ears, it comes in third in Mascagni’s oeuvre, after […]

Continue Reading

Daniel Catan’s Florencia Invigorates New York City Opera

Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater; New York—The second installment in the New York City Opera’s hoped-for renaissance recently emerged victorious, unlike its ill-advised Tosca several months ago. Borrowing the production from Nashville Opera, it presented the New York premiere of Daniel Catan’s lush, neo-Romantic Florenzia en el Amazonas, which premiered in Houston in 1996 […]

Continue Reading

Here We Go Again–Andris Nelsons Will Record (Gasp!) Beethoven and Bruckner

There was a time when recording a Beethoven cycle was an enterprise undertaken with the benefit of a lifetime’s familiarity with the music, redolent with the (theoretical) wisdom of—if not old—at least a very mature age. Many of the greatest 20th-century conductors never completed their recorded traversals of all nine symphonies, at least not in […]

Continue Reading

A Tale of Two Hammerklaviers

David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center, NY; May 8, 2016/Carnegie Hall, NY; May 14, 2016—It’s not often that one hears two performances of Beethoven’s monumental “Hammerklavier” sonata (the classical piano repertoire’s Mt. Everest) in close proximity. But that’s what happened on two consecutive weekends this month, first with Murray Perahia at Lincoln Center, followed by Yuja […]

Continue Reading